Join

Soulton Hall

Near Wem, Shrewsbury, Shropshire. SY4 5RS

Soulton Hall

Experience this house

Visit

Historic Houses members must pay for entrance for this property.
Historic Houses members must pay for entrance for this property.
for the latest information.
Accessibility

There are accessible facilities for visitors in Soulton Court, the 1650s/1780s range of buildings in the precincts of the house. The hall presents challenges for visitors with access needs as it has no level access and the significant rooms are ranged over several floors without a lift.

Diversity and inclusion considerations matter a lot to us. Our website contains more detailed information. Please contact us to discuss adjustments that will help and we will do our best to support you.

Does our information need updating?
Let us know here

Unveil the secrets nestled within the walls of Soulton Hall, a captivating residence steeped in history and intrigue. Built by Sir Rowland Hill, a man woven into the very fabric of the Elizabethan era, the house is constructed in coded message waiting to be deciphered.

Within its walls lies a story of defiance to oppression, of artistic inspiration, and of the dawn of a new age. Sir Rowland Hill, a pivotal figure in Reformation and on the Privy Councils of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I, used Soulton Hall as a clandestine base for his most daring act – the publication of the Geneva Bible. This revolutionary translation, deemed heretical by some, is one of the most important texts ever printed.

Soulton Hall was also a refuge. During times of persecution, the house provided sanctuary to those in danger, offering them a safe haven from the storm. Scholarly materials, were also kept secure home within Soulton’s walls, ensuring their survival for future generations.

Sir Rowland’s influence extended beyond the realm of religion. His network of contacts and his passion for the arts played a pivotal role in igniting the creative spark of William Shakespeare, is cousin via Mary Arden. The idyllic setting and clandestine activities within Soulton Hall are thought to have inspired the beloved comedy As You Like It. This is underlined by the fact that Soulton was the family home of the Lodge family prior to 1556 and hence is tied to the write of the source book, by Thomas Lodge, Rosalynde (1590) as well as ‘Old’ Sir Rowland.

Soulton is a tangible connection to the Tudor Period and Elizabethan Golden Age, a period of unparalleled danger, creativity and intellectual awakening.

The house stands as a testament to Sir Rowland Hill, a kind and brave man who dared to challenge the status quo and ushered in a new era.

Soulton Hall is more than just a house; it’s a coded message waiting to be unravelled, a testament to a bygone era, and a reminder of the power of human ingenuity and the enduring spirit of resistance.

The tour includes the concealed chapel, priests hide, a sense of some of the Renaissance codes, the chess court and Wren Steps. The As You Like It dancing pavement and the Rowland Hill Furniture.

Tours that are scheduled will be listed below. If none are scheduled yet, please check back later, or find other tours you might enjoy on our tours listing page here.

for the latest information.
Accessibility

There are accessible facilities for visitors in Soulton Court, the 1650s/1780s range of buildings in the precincts of the house. The hall presents challenges for visitors with access needs as it has no level access and the significant rooms are ranged over several floors without a lift.

Diversity and inclusion considerations matter a lot to us. Our website contains more detailed information. Please contact us to discuss adjustments that will help and we will do our best to support you.

Does our information need updating?
Let us know here

Soulton Hall

Soulton Hall