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Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens

Amongst the best gardens of its type anywhere in the world.

Abbotsbury, Dorset, DT3 4LA

Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens

Experience this house

History

Accessibility

Dogs
Well-behaved dogs are welcome on leads throughout the Garden, as well as outside and inside the coffee shop.

Toilets
Disabled and baby change facilities available at the coffee shop.

Wheelchairs
Approximately 50% of the Garden is accessible to disabled visitors. The paths at the Gardens are gravel and some areas are very steep due to the natural topography. There is a recommended route with more even paths which showcases some of the key areas of the Gardens. These paths are accessible by wheelchair but due to the gravel surface may not be suitable for all types of mobility scooter.
There is ramp access to the coffee shop. Wheelchairs and scooters are not available for hire.

Visit the house's website
for the latest information.

The history of Abbotsbury is tied closely with the creation of the monastery that once dominated the village and the Fox-Strangways family.

In 1541, the abbey lands were leased to Sir Giles Strangways, who converted part of the old monastery into a mansion.

Later, Sir John Strangways, who was a staunch Royalist, held Abbotsbury for the King until the civil war broke out in 1644.

Defoe, on his tour of England in 1724, said: ‘the mackerel are the finest I ever saw sold at the seaside for a hundred a penny’. The London Journal recorded in 1752 that ‘all the people of Abbotsbury, including the Vicar, are thieves, smugglers and plunderers of wrecks’. Changes were, however, taking place. Susannah Strangways-Horner, mother-in-law of the 1st Earl of Ilchester, left money in her will to found a school in 1758. In 1765 her daughter Elizabeth, 1st Countess of Ilchester, built the castle on a site overlooking Lyme Bay.

Accessibility

Dogs
Well-behaved dogs are welcome on leads throughout the Garden, as well as outside and inside the coffee shop.

Toilets
Disabled and baby change facilities available at the coffee shop.

Wheelchairs
Approximately 50% of the Garden is accessible to disabled visitors. The paths at the Gardens are gravel and some areas are very steep due to the natural topography. There is a recommended route with more even paths which showcases some of the key areas of the Gardens. These paths are accessible by wheelchair but due to the gravel surface may not be suitable for all types of mobility scooter.
There is ramp access to the coffee shop. Wheelchairs and scooters are not available for hire.

Visit the house's website
for the latest information.