Overview

The gatehouse and Hall may have been built by the last abbot of Bury St Edmunds about 1520 although more likely by John Croft a wealthy merchant.

There was probably a moated house already on the site, the first documentary reference to it being from the middle 13th Century. The colonnade linking the gatehouse and main house was built in 1580. The gatehouse has turrets surmounted by terracotta figures and contains a very rare 16th century wall painting of the Four Ages of Man. The coat of arms of Queen Mary of France, Henry VIII’s younger sister, and later Duchess of Suffolk, is displayed above the entrance.

The Hall consists of large timber frames joined by iron ties. The front downstairs rooms are very heavily timbered with some side uprights rising through the house to the roof. The lounge has one of the largest inglenooks in Suffolk. The rear frame includes a great reception hall with heavily carved beams and interesting detail. It is said to date from the early 16th century. Beyond it were the parlour and solar end of an earlier hall which were demolished before the 19th Century.

 The house was partially faced in brick in the 1840s by the Rev. Benyon, the wealthiest clergyman in England. His builder complained that the house was full of voids, which are indeed still there.

Accommodation: holiday cottage and B&B.

Tour features

Tour of the house and grounds led by the owner.

Refreshments

Tea, coffee and cakes.

Access

Ground floor and gardens only.

Special restrictions

No photography in the house, no dogs.

 

Interested? Click the button below to see available dates. If you're a member and are logged in you'll be able to see the discounted option also.


Opening
Opening

2019 tour dates

  • 17 February
  • 17 March
  • 9 April
  • 14 and 16 May
  • 12 and 16 June
  • 8 July
  • 26 September

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Find Us
Find us

Directions and address

West Stow Hall, Icklingham Road, West Stow, Suffolk IP28 6EY.

West Stow Hall is situated on the Icklingham road in the small village of West Stow, four and a half miles north west of Bury St Edmunds and three miles south east of Icklingham. The Anglo-Saxon village, about one and a half miles from the Hall, is also on the Icklingham road and is well signposted. The entrance to the Hall is nearly opposite the trout farm and is shared with West Stow Stud. Continue past the Stud buildings to the end of the drive about 200 yards. Park in front of the Hall, or where indicated. Tel: 01284 728127.

Admission
Admission

All 2019 tours are £17.50 per person, with a discount for Historic Houses members.


Upcoming events

6 Dec 2019

West Stow Hall, East

The gatehouse and Hall may have been built by the last abbot of Bury St Edmunds about 1520 although more likely by John Croft a wealthy merchant.

There was probably a moated house already on the site, the first documentary reference to it being from the middle 13th Century. The colonnade linking the gatehouse and main house was built in 1580. The gatehouse has turrets surmounted by terracotta figures and contains a very rare 16th century wall painting of the Four Ages of Man. The coat of arms of Queen Mary of France, Henry VIII’s younger sister, and later Duchess of Suffolk, is displayed above the entrance.

The Hall consists of large timber frames joined by iron ties. The front downstairs rooms are very heavily timbered with some side uprights rising through the house to the roof. The lounge has one of the largest inglenooks in Suffolk. The rear frame includes a great reception hall with heavily carved beams and interesting detail. It is said to date from the early 16th century. Beyond it were the parlour and solar end of an earlier hall which were demolished before the 19th Century.

The house was partially faced in brick in the 1840s by the Rev. Benyon, the wealthiest clergyman in England. His builder complained that the house was full of voids, which are indeed still there.

Festive tour including mulled wine and canapes.