Please note: This house does not offer free entry to Historic House members.
For alternative options please see other opening options.

Other opening

Overview

There was probably a moated house already on the site, the first documentary reference to it being from the middle 13th Century.

The colonnade linking the gatehouse and main house was built in 1580. The gatehouse has turrets surmounted by terracotta figures and contains a very rare 16th century wall painting of the Four Ages of Man. The coat of arms of Queen Mary of France, Henry VIII’s younger sister, and later Duchess of Suffolk, is displayed above the entrance.

The Hall consists of large timber frames joined by iron ties. The front downstairs rooms are very heavily timbered with some side uprights rising through the house to the roof. The lounge has one of the largest inglenooks in Suffolk. The rear frame includes a great reception hall with heavily carved beams and interesting detail. It is said to date from the early 16th century. Beyond it were the parlour and solar end of an earlier hall which were demolished before the 19th Century.

The house was partially faced in brick in the 1840s by the Rev. Benyon, the wealthiest clergyman in England. His builder complained that the house was full of voids, which are indeed still there.


Opening
Opening

Visit by Private Tours only.

Find Us
Find us

West Stow Hall is situated on the Icklingham road in the small village of West Stow, four and a half miles north west of Bury St Edmunds and three miles south east of Icklingham. The Anglo-Saxon village, about one and a half miles from the Hall, is also on the Icklingham road and is well signposted. The entrance to the Hall is nearly opposite the trout farm and is shared with West Stow Stud. Continue past the Stud buildings to the end of the drive about 200 yards. Park in front of the Hall, or where indicated.

Forthcoming Tours

10 Dec 2020
6PM - 9PM | £18.00

Tour Overview

Go on a tour of the house and grounds led by the owner of West Stow Hall.

Tour duration

2 - 2.5 hours

Tour prices

£18.00 per person.

Refreshments

Tea, coffee and cakes.

Access notes

Ground floor and gardens only.

Special restrictions

No photography in the house, no dogs.

Invitation to Stay

We have three bedrooms in the Hall, all our rooms are large with sofas and comfortable chairs making them very pleasant places in which to relax.  WiFi, TVs and tea and coffee making facilities are also provided.

We offer a wide range of home cooked breakfasts and endeavour to cater for all tastes.

Bedroom 1 has a king-sized bed and an ensuite shower room.  It is a lovely bright room with views over the gardens and woods and is decorated in a French style with a rattan bed and rosy Toile de Jouy furnishings.

Bedroom 2 and 3 are linked by a large bathroom with a bath and separate shower.  They form a family suite but if only one room is booked the other room will not be used, ensuring complete privacy.  Bedroom 2 is decorated in a Victorian manner with a king-sized mahogany bed, antique furniture and Persian rugs.  It has views over the front paddock.  Bedroom 3 has twin bed which can be joined to form a super-king bed.

To book email: enquiries@weststowhall.com or ring 01284 728127


Opening
Opening

Visit by Private Tours only.

Find Us
Find us

West Stow Hall is situated on the Icklingham road in the small village of West Stow, four and a half miles north west of Bury St Edmunds and three miles south east of Icklingham. The Anglo-Saxon village, about one and a half miles from the Hall, is also on the Icklingham road and is well signposted. The entrance to the Hall is nearly opposite the trout farm and is shared with West Stow Stud. Continue past the Stud buildings to the end of the drive about 200 yards. Park in front of the Hall, or where indicated.

Other opening


West Stow Hall's history and features

Legend has it that West Stow Hall was built by Sir John Croftes, 'Master of the Horse to Mary Tudor', Dowager Queen of France and Duchess of Suffolk and that he had her coat of arms placed over the door to the gatehouse by way of a compliment to her.

Sir John was a substantial sheep farmer (flockmaster) who rebuilt his family’s existing manor house called Jinneys in around 1520. In 1526 he leased the remainder of West Stow from the Abbot of Bury St Edmunds and in 1540 after the dissolution of the Abbey purchased the same from the Crown for £497.

While some historians have suggested that the Hall was built by the last Abbot, it is clear from the documentary evidence that Sir John, and his grandson were responsible for its construction.

The highly decorative brick gatehouse was built circa 1530. It may be that the entrance facade was added to a pre-existing structure. In the chamber overlooking the entrance is a wall-painting, known as the 'Four Ages of Man', thought to date from circa 1575. Traces of paint elsewhere in the room would suggest that the whole room may originally have been painted.

Originally the gatehouse was an independent building from the house. It was connected to the Hall by a colonnade built by Sir John’s grandson.

The house was originally surrounded by a moat which was filled in by 1840. The moat was bridged by the gatehouse and passed through the two arches underneath it. The tops of the arches on the southern side can be seen in the shrub border.