Please note: This house does not offer free entry to Historic House members.
For alternative options please see other opening options.

Other opening

Overview

One of the finest Arts and Crafts houses in Britain, built by E.S. Prior for Percy Lloyd, 1903-5. 'By far the most interesting building in this part of Norfolk... a violently idiosyncratic house reminiscent of Gaudi,' says Pevsner.

Voewood was restored by the rare books dealer, Simon Finch, over six years to fulfil his loves of architecture, art and books. The estate has seventeen bedrooms and lots of action in a building that ‘responds well to events.’


Opening
Opening

Visit by Private Tours only.

Find Us
Find us

Take the A148 marked for Cromer and continue along this road for about 8 miles. You will pass a sign to Holt town centre on your left, and a few hundred yards after this you will reach another roundabout. Turn left, again following the A148 marked for Cromer. After about a mile you will reach the village of High Kelling. The speed limit is 40 miles an hour, as soon as you are in this speed restriction start to indicate left. The driveway to Voewood is the next entrance on the left after the turn to Kelling Hospital and a bus stop in a layby. Once you have turned you will see a set of large orange gates, either side of the entrance, continue driving along the drive for about 100 yards and you will see Voewood.

Forthcoming Tours

14 Oct 2020
10AM - 12PM | £20.00

14 Oct 2020
2PM - 4PM | £20.00

18 Nov 2020
2PM - 4PM | £20.00

9 Dec 2020
10AM - 12PM | £20.00

9 Dec 2020
2PM - 4PM | £20.00

Tour Overview

The tour covers all the rooms, including the 17 bedrooms, and the garden.

Tour duration

2 hours

Tour prices

£20.00 per person

Refreshments

Tea, coffee and biscuits.

Restrictions

No photography in the house.


Opening
Opening

Visit by Private Tours only.

Find Us
Find us

Take the A148 marked for Cromer and continue along this road for about 8 miles. You will pass a sign to Holt town centre on your left, and a few hundred yards after this you will reach another roundabout. Turn left, again following the A148 marked for Cromer. After about a mile you will reach the village of High Kelling. The speed limit is 40 miles an hour, as soon as you are in this speed restriction start to indicate left. The driveway to Voewood is the next entrance on the left after the turn to Kelling Hospital and a bus stop in a layby. Once you have turned you will see a set of large orange gates, either side of the entrance, continue driving along the drive for about 100 yards and you will see Voewood.

Other opening


Voewood's history and features

Home Place, High Kelling was originally named Voewood and subsequently Kelling Place. It was built for the Reverend Percy Robert Lloyd (1868–1937). Lloyd was the tenth son of the famous publisher and paper manufacturer Edward Lloyd (1815–1890). He was born in Water House, Walthamstow - coincidentally the childhood home of William Morris - and educated at Eastbourne College. In 1887 he went up to Pembroke College, Oxford. Both at Eastbourne and Oxford he was a noted athlete, although he suffered periodically from unknown health problems. After taking his degree in 1891 he went to Ely Theological College and was ordained three years later, taking a curacy at St Andrews, Lincoln. He stayed here for six years, during which time he married Dorothea Mallam (1874–1907). She was the eldest child of James Thomas Mallam (1850–1915) of Oxford, a family which had connections with the Pre-Raphaelites. With the help of his wife he translated and arranged in English a Tibetan novel by Albert Arthur Yongden, "Lama Yongden", entitled Mipam. He also co-authored a work on the Habsburgs and Italy. In around 1900 he left Lincoln to undertake work with the Norwich diocese. It is at around this point that he presumably commissioned E.S. Prior. The money used to pay for the house - £60,000 - most probably derived from a stake in the family business, now run by his elder brother Frank.

The house is based on a butterfly plan. The three storey central portion of the house is flanked by splayed two-storey wings. The plan enabled Prior to maximise views out and to give the best orientation to a range of rooms. He could also relate the external spaces to the internal areas. The area contained within the splay faced the gardens, with the northern of the wings acting as the entrance, with a two storey porch and daylight basement. This wing also contained the library and billiard room at ground floor level. The wing opposite contained the kitchen and service accommodation together with the dining room. The fruit and vegetable garden lay adjacent. The entrance, through oak doors, leads into a six-sided hall up a straight flight of Hoptonwood stone stairs into an octagonal lobby.

The gardens were of great renown and highly regarded. Home Place was perhaps Prior's greatest garden design. Garden making was a preoccupation of his middle period. Terraces extend from the wings of the house and end in steps leading down to the garden level. The garden is also reached from the terrace by a double flight of steps leading to two stone paths, separated by a water feature in the form of a stepped stone tank containing water-lilies, iris and forget-me-not. The central feature of the garden is a large basin. Pergolas with masonry walls lead east and west.