Overview

From its conception, Spencer House was recognised as one of the most sumptuous private residences ever built in London and a building of unique importance in the history of English architecture.

Designed by John Vardy and James ‘Athenian’ Stuart, the State Rooms are amongst the first neo-classical interiors in Europe. The House has regained the full splendour of its eighteenth-century appearance after a painstaking ten-year restoration under the Chairmanship of Lord Rothschild.

The restoration has enabled the return of some key pieces of furniture to their original locations, including Vardy’s elaborate giltwood console tables in the Dining Room and Stuart’s Painted Room suite, both on loan from the V&A, London. Particularly welcome was the return to the House of Guercino’s King David, lent from a private collection.
Spencer House is available for exclusive corporate events and private functions throughout the year. Receptions, Lunches, Dinners, Weddings and Presentations can all be accommodated within the magnificent State Rooms. The House is also open to the Public for guided tours on Sundays.


Opening
Opening

2020

Every Sunday except during August. 10am to 4.30pm (last tour).

Find Us
Find us

Spencer House is situated at 27 St James’s Place, London SW1A 1NR, overlooking Green Park. The House can be reached via St. James’s Street or Green Park.

The House is only a few minutes away from Green Park underground station, or a 10-minute bus ride from Victoria station. To walk from Green Park underground station (about 3 minutes): Exit the tube station on the south side, walk down Queen’s Walk for a few hundred yards. Turn left through the small alleyway off the left side of Queen’s Walk for about 150 yards. Turn right and Spencer House will be in front of you.

Parking

  • None
No parking is available for visitors at all.

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Wheelchair ramps/routes
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible toilets

Please check the website for further information, admission times and details for our special events

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Weddings

This unique 18th century private palace combines magnificent works of art with subtle personal touches that together provide a perfect backdrop for private and corporate events, receptions, state room weddings, meetings and presentations.

The Ground Floor rooms can accommodate up to 250 guests or up to 450 with the use of the terrace during summer months. In the colder months 450 can be accommodated using the Ground and first floor rooms.

Facilities

  • Suppliers list
  • Accessible parking
  • In-house catering

Corporate Hire

Corporate events

Spencer House is an elegant and historic event venue for hosting meetings, lunches, receptions, dinners and intimate weddings in London. The House is available for private and corporate events and is hired exclusively to each client. We can accommodate up to 126 for lunch or dinner and 450 for receptions.

Facilities

  • Wifi
  • Accessible toilets
  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Projector and screen
  • Lunch
  • Breakfast
  • Dinner
  • Refreshments

Opening
Opening

2020

Every Sunday except during August. 10am to 4.30pm (last tour).

Find Us
Find us

Spencer House is situated at 27 St James’s Place, London SW1A 1NR, overlooking Green Park. The House can be reached via St. James’s Street or Green Park.

The House is only a few minutes away from Green Park underground station, or a 10-minute bus ride from Victoria station. To walk from Green Park underground station (about 3 minutes): Exit the tube station on the south side, walk down Queen’s Walk for a few hundred yards. Turn left through the small alleyway off the left side of Queen’s Walk for about 150 yards. Turn right and Spencer House will be in front of you.

Parking

  • None
No parking is available for visitors at all.

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Wheelchair ramps/routes
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible toilets

Other opening


Spencer House's history and features

John Spencer initially employed the Palladian architect John Vardy, a pupil of William Kent. Vardy was responsible for the external elevations of Spencer House and the design of the ground floor rooms including some of the furniture.

James ‘Athenian’ Stuart, then newly returned from Greece, superseded Vardy as Lord Spencer’s architect in 1758. As a result, the House became the first example in London of the application of accurate Greek detail to interior decoration, making it one of the pioneer examples of neo-classical architecture.

Although Spencer House was conceived as a showcase of classical design, it was also designed for pleasure and a festive theme runs through the decoration of all the many State Rooms which were used for receptions and family gatherings. The first Earl Spencer and his wife were prominent figures in London society and during their lifetime Spencer House was often the setting for lavish entertainments. Their descendants, notably the fourth and sixth Earls, both of whom served as Lord Chamberlain of the Royal Household, continued this tradition.

Refinements to the House

Following the death of the first Earl Spencer in 1783 the House was partly remodelled by the architect, Henry Holland, who was soon to be engaged by the Prince Regent on the construction of Carlton House. Holland added the Greek Ionic columns in the Dining Room, encased in Siena scagliola, and the large mahogany doors in the Staircase Hall, the Ante Room and the Library.

In the 1840s the ground floor was decorated and the first floor was restored by the famous Victorian architect, Philip Hardwick.

Thirty years later the Parisian designer, Barbier, redecorated the ground floor rooms.

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Fun Facts

Under the direction of its current occupants and leaseholders, RIT Capital Partners plc, Spencer House has been the object of one of the most ambitious restoration projects to be undertaken in the 20th century.

The House has been restored to its original splendour and is used partly as offices and as a place where the public may visit for guided tours on Sundays throughout the year (excluding August) and where events can be held in the historic setting of the State Rooms.

Find out more