Overview

Sezincote is a Mughal Indian palace set in the Cotswold Hills, created by the nabob Charles Cockerell in 1805.

The house is surmounted by a copper dome and minarets, and set in a picturesque water garden with seven pools, waterfalls, a grotto and a temple to Surya, the Hindu Sun God. A curving Orangery frames the Persian Garden of Paradise.

Samuel Pepys Cockerell, younger brother of the owner, was the architect, with the artist Thomas Daniell advising on classical Indian architecture. Repton consulted on landscaping the grounds.


Opening
Opening

2020

Garden: open year round (excluding December) on Thursdays, Fridays, Bank Holiday Mondays.

House: open May to September on Thursdays, Fridays and Bank Holiday Mondays. From 2pm to 5.30pm or dusk.

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///motoring.ponies.upstairs What does this mean?

Access is 1.5 miles out of Moreton in Marsh on the A44 towards Evesham, opposite the entrance to Batsford Arboretum.

Moreton in Marsh railway station is 2 miles away.

 

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free. 

House and garden: £10 (regretfully children not admitted)
Garden only: £5 (£1 for children)

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Accessible toilets
  • Accessible parking
  • Access statement available
  • Guide dogs welcome
Group Visits
Group Visits

We are happy to accommodate groups (minimum of 25) out of normal opening hours, if it is possible to find a mutually convenient time and date.

There is a £10 group supplement for the garden only, and £30 for house and garden, to cover costs of opening.

Email us on  enquiries@sezincote.com or call on  01386 700444.

Please check the website for further information, admission times and details for our special events

Visit website

Weddings

There are few houses as romantic and theatrical as Sezincote to host your wedding in, an Indianised fantasy of cotswold stone and copper domes.

With only 6 weddings available yearly each one is unique and tailored to the couple.

The curved orangery filled with flowers and plants, with doors open on to the persian garden takes up to 240 guests, for civil ceremonies or religious blessings.

The gardens and temples are a beautiful setting for perfect photos of the day. The house is lit up to provide an incredible backdrop to the clear marquees for dinner and dancing.

Facilities

  • Suppliers list
  • Accessible parking
  • Wedding planner
  • Guest parking

Thank you for the most magical day in your home, it was more wonderful than we could have imagined. It was such a privilege and a real joy to work with you.

Francesca and Matt 2017


Corporate Hire

Corporate events

Sezincote is available for corporate hire and events. 

Facilities

  • Accessible toilets
  • Refreshments

Opening
Opening

2020

Garden: open year round (excluding December) on Thursdays, Fridays, Bank Holiday Mondays.

House: open May to September on Thursdays, Fridays and Bank Holiday Mondays. From 2pm to 5.30pm or dusk.

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///motoring.ponies.upstairs What does this mean?

Access is 1.5 miles out of Moreton in Marsh on the A44 towards Evesham, opposite the entrance to Batsford Arboretum.

Moreton in Marsh railway station is 2 miles away.

 

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free. 

House and garden: £10 (regretfully children not admitted)
Garden only: £5 (£1 for children)

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Accessible toilets
  • Accessible parking
  • Access statement available
  • Guide dogs welcome
Group Visits
Group Visits

We are happy to accommodate groups (minimum of 25) out of normal opening hours, if it is possible to find a mutually convenient time and date.

There is a £10 group supplement for the garden only, and £30 for house and garden, to cover costs of opening.

Email us on  enquiries@sezincote.com or call on  01386 700444.

Other opening

The House

Timed house tour tickets are purchased on the gate subject to availability.  For the safety and comfort of our visitors we can only take 25 people round the house at a time (every half-hour), so at busier times of the year there are not enough house tour tickets to satisfy demand.  Come early (1.45pm) to avoid disappointment! 

  • The house is open May to September inclusive
  • Thursdays, Fridays and Bank Holiday Mondays; 2.30 pm to 5.30 pm
  • Admisson: £10 (includes house tour and garden)
  • We regret no credit or debit cards accepted
  • Tea and cake served May to September
  • No children under 10 in the house without special permission.

The Garden

  • Sezincote Garden is open January to November
  • Thursdays, Fridays and Bank Holiday Mondays; 2pm to 6pm
  • Admission: £5 Adults, £1.50 Children
  • We regret no credit or debit cards accepted
  • No dogs except Guide Dogs

Disabled Visitors

Much of the garden is on a slope with steep banks, gravel paths and irregular stone bridges that make it difficult for wheelchairs and those with walking difficulties.  Enough of the garden however can be accessed to make a satisfactory visit.  The upstairs portion of the house tour is also regrettably inaccessible to those in wheelchairs and those who cannot climb stairs.  In such cases the house guide will give you some books and photograph albums to browse in the dining room while the rest of the group is upstairs. Please contact us for full information for disabled visitors.


Sezincote's history and features

The house was the whim of Colonel John Cockerell, grandson of the diarist Samuel Pepys, who returned to England having amassed a fortune in the East India Company. John died in 1798, three years after his return, and the estate passed to his youngest brother Charles, who had also worked for the company. He commissioned his brother Samuel, an architect, to design and build an Indian house in the Mogul style of Rajasthan, complete with minarets, peacock-tail windows, jali-work railings and pavilions.

Once completed, Sezincote dazzled all who came. When the Prince Regent visited in 1807, an event commemorated in a Daniell painting owned by the family, he was so impressed that he went on to change his plans for the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. Designed by John Nash, it echoed the exotic Indian style he’d admired at Sezincote.

The poet John Betjeman, who used to visit as a student at Oxford, captured Sezincote’s charm in Summoned by Bells: 

 Down the drive, Under the early yellow leaves of oaks… the bridge, the waterfall, the Temple Pool and there they burst on us, the onion domes.

He also alludes to the exotic “home of the oaks”, for Sezincote (pronounced Seezincote) is derived from Cheisnecote, from chêne, French for oak, and cot for dwelling.

S.P.Cockerell was greatly assisted by the artist Thomas Daniell in conceiving the design for Sezincote. Daniell had spent ten years in India with his nephew William, making aquatints, watercolours and oils of Indian buildings and landscapes using a ‘camera obscura’ and thus had an unparalleled knowledge of Indian architecture. The interior is purely classical – Greek Revival – and no attempt was ever made to Indianise it. Similarly the garden adjacent to the house and thus an extension of its domestic space, originally did not share in the Indian character of the water garden.

Find out more here


A word from the owner

Sezincote is a family home, full of dogs, cats and children. We hope you enjoy visiting our special house, thought to be the only mogul building surviving in Western Europe.

Things to See

Fun Facts

Neglected during the Second World War, the garden was restored in 1968 by Sir Cyril and Lady Kleinwort who were advised by Graham Stuart Thomas. Their work includes the canals and Irish yews in the South Garden, evocative of Moghul paradise gardens, a curving conservatory, home to many tender climbing plants, and little pavilion also in Indian style, and all the exceptionally fine planting of the water garden, where many rare plants can be seen.

Streams and pools are lined with great clumps of bog-loving plants and the stream is crossed by an Indian bridge adorned with Brahmin bulls. Ornaments include a temple to Surya the sun god, and a snake coiled around a column in the Snake Pond.