Historic Houses' members visit free. Interested in joining? Find out more.

Overview

Parham is a traditional stone E-shaped Elizabethan mansion, built in 1557. Idyllically set in the heart of an ancient deer park, below the South Downs, the Elizabethan house contains an important collection of needlework, paintings and furniture.

Parham has always been a well-loved family home, and only three families have lived here since its foundation stone was laid.

Complete with a Great Hall and spectacular Long Gallery which is the third longest in England, Parham's tranquillity and timeless beauty have changed little over the centuries. The gardens include a four-acre Walled Garden with stunning herbaceous borders and Pleasure Grounds.
 


Opening
Opening

2019

21 April to 13 October: Wednesday to Friday, Sundays, Bank Holiday Mondays.

House: 2pm to 5pm

Gardens: noon to 5pm.              

Find Us
Find us

Midway between Pulborough & Storrington on A283. Equidistant from A24 & A29.

For those travelling by public transport, the nearest train station is Pulborough, which is a short taxi ride from Parham. There is also an hourly bus service on route 100 to the main gate, excluding Sundays.

 

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free.

House & Gardens:
Adults - £11
Senior Citizens - £10
Children (5-15 years) - £6
Under 5s - Free

Gardens:
Adults - £9
Senior Citizens - £8
Children (5-15 years) - £5
Under 5s - Free

More admission details

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
  • Accessible toilets
  • Access statement available
  • Wheelchair ramps/routes
Group Visits
Group Visits

For special interest groups and those seeking a more luxurious experience, by special arrangement we can offer exclusive tailored group visits on Mondays and Tuesdays. 

Prices will start from a minimum of £65 per person and minimum group numbers will apply.

Please contact us to discuss your requirements.

 


Things to See

Fun Facts

In the Great Hall there is a painting of Henry Frederick by Robert Peake. painted in 1611.

He was the eldest son of James I who tragically died in 1612 at which point all the allegorical figures in the background relevant to him being the next King were painted out.

These figures were rediscovered in 1985 when the picture was x-rayed and the picture has been restored to its former glory.


Weddings


Corporate Hire

School Visits

We welcome visits from schools and education groups.