Overview

Ingatestone Hall is a 16th-century mansion built by Sir William Petre, Secretary of State to four Tudor monarchs. 

The house is still occupied by his descendants and contains furniture, pictures and memorabilia accumulated over the centuries.

The Hall stands in open countryside, one mile from the village of Ingatestone and substantially retains its original Tudor form and appearance with its mullioned windows, high chimneys, crow-step gables and oak-panelled rooms. It is surrounded by ten acres of enclosed gardens comprising extensive lawns, walled garden and stew pond.


Opening
Opening

2020

11 April to 30 September

Sunday, Wednesday & Bank Holiday Monday

12pm to 5pm

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///cake.reach.introWhat does this mean?

Ingatestone lies between Brentwood & Chelmsford off the A12. From the London end of the High St., take Station Lane and continue over the level crossing for 1 km.

Ingatestone Station (London-Norwich line) is 0.75 miles away.

Buses between Chelmsford & Brentwood stop at the top of Station Lane

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free. 


Adults: £7
Concessions: £6 
Children (5-16): £3
Under 5: Free

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Accessible toilets
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
Group Visits
Group Visits

By prior arrangement only, tours of the house and grounds, led by our experienced guides, are offered throughout the year when we are not otherwise open to visitors, even on days when we are open to the general public. 

Private tours can be arranged in the morning or evening and the takes about 1.5 hours. Time can be allowed for a visit to our gift shop, or for refreshments or a light meal in the Summer Parlour and an opportunity to relax in the gardens.  Refreshments and meals can be provided with prior notice.

Individual tour groups are limited to a maximum of 25 persons but it is possible to run up to three separate tours concurrently.  

Please ring the Estate Office (01277 353010) during normal office hours.  

Please check the website for further information, admission times and details for our special events

Visit website

Forthcoming Tours

Tour Overview

The tours will be conducted by Lord Petre or his son Dominic, and are scheduled to take place on days when the house is subsequently open to the public. You are welcome, after the tour has finished, to linger to enjoy the grounds.

Tour duration

2.5 hours

Tour prices

£16.00 per person.

Refreshments

Tea or coffee and home made (at the Hall) cakes.

Access notes

No wheelchair access upstairs. Three internal steps on ground floor.

Special restrictions

No dogs (except guide dogs).

Weddings

Ingatestone provides a suitable venue for many different styles of wedding. There are no prescribed formats. Couples are free to choose their own caterers, entertainers etc and our own wedding co-ordinator will be on hand to advise.

Facilities

  • Suppliers list
  • Accessible parking

Whether you are planning to celebrate your wedding in the company of 20 or 200 of your friends and family, Ingatestone Hall can provide a most attractive setting for the festivities.

The Owners


Corporate Hire

Corporate events

Ingatestone Hall provides a peaceful and relaxing setting for conferences and seminars of all kinds, particularly if you are looking for something less stark and soulless than the conventional conference centre.  

Corporate away-days, seminars and presentations for clients and committee meetings are among the formats that can be accommodated. We also welcome bookings for corporate receptions and dinners.  

There are five principal rooms inside the house and four main areas in the gardens and grounds that are available for your use, either individually or in combination.  

Facilities

  • Accessible toilets
  • Refreshments
  • Plentiful parking

Opening
Opening

2020

11 April to 30 September

Sunday, Wednesday & Bank Holiday Monday

12pm to 5pm

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///cake.reach.introWhat does this mean?

Ingatestone lies between Brentwood & Chelmsford off the A12. From the London end of the High St., take Station Lane and continue over the level crossing for 1 km.

Ingatestone Station (London-Norwich line) is 0.75 miles away.

Buses between Chelmsford & Brentwood stop at the top of Station Lane

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free. 


Adults: £7
Concessions: £6 
Children (5-16): £3
Under 5: Free

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Accessible toilets
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
Group Visits
Group Visits

By prior arrangement only, tours of the house and grounds, led by our experienced guides, are offered throughout the year when we are not otherwise open to visitors, even on days when we are open to the general public. 

Private tours can be arranged in the morning or evening and the takes about 1.5 hours. Time can be allowed for a visit to our gift shop, or for refreshments or a light meal in the Summer Parlour and an opportunity to relax in the gardens.  Refreshments and meals can be provided with prior notice.

Individual tour groups are limited to a maximum of 25 persons but it is possible to run up to three separate tours concurrently.  

Please ring the Estate Office (01277 353010) during normal office hours.  

Other opening


School Visits

Ingatestone Hall is a valuable resource for teachers organising expeditions or field trips for their pupils.  

In our experience, the venue is most suitable for pupils in the last year of primary school but older and younger students are welcome too.  The Hall is not a museum but, having been occupied by the same family for 450 years it largely retains its original form and appearance and contains furniture, pictures and memorabilia.  William Petre, who built the Hall, was a leading Tudor statesman and the well-documented details of his life and those of his descendants illuminate many aspects of English history.  
  
In addition, the Hall and its grounds provide material for study and project work in Art & Design, Geography, Science and Mathematics.  

School visits normally take place on Tuesdays, Thursdays or Fridays during the Summer Term but can sometimes be arranged at other times.  Such visits do not take place when the house and grounds are open to the public and only one school party is admitted on any particular day.


Ingatestone Hall's history and features

In about 950 AD, King Edgar granted to the Abbey of Our Lady & St.  Ethelburga at Barking lands at Yenge-atte-Stone (whence we get the modern name of Ingatestone).  As one of the principal manors held by the nuns of Barking, it subsequently also became known as Gynge Abbes.  In 1535, Henry VIII ordered his Chief Secretary, Thomas Cromwell, to put in train the process that was to lead to the Dissolution of the Monasteries.  Cromwell's Proctor or assistant, a young lawyer from Devon called William Petre, had the job of visiting the monastic houses of Southern England to draw up a record of their possessions and to persuade them to surrender to the King.

Among the abbeys he visited was that of Barking and he was immediately attracted by its manor of Ynge-atte-Stone and took a lease of the property.  One of the attractions was, no doubt, its Latinised name - Ginge ad Petram - which made it sound as though it had belonged to the family for centuries.  In 1539, the lands of Barking Abbey having been surrendered to the Crown, Dr.  Petre purchased the manor for its full market price of £849 12s 6d.  This transaction, together with the purchases and grants of other former monastic lands, could well have been construed as the plundering of Church property but a Bull of Confirmation issued by Pope Paul IV exonerates Petre from any such charge and absolves him from the Interdict of Excommunication imposed on Henry VIII provided that he endowed an almshouse foundation for the poor.  The almshouses he accordingly founded may still be seen (though not on their original site) in Ingatestone High Street.

Petre considered the old steward's house at Ingatestone "scarce mete for a fermor to dwell on" and so he demolished it, building instead, on the same site, the house we substantially see today - "very fair, large and stately, made of brick and embattl'd".  This house was in the form of a hollow square and, thanks to Petre's contacts with the monasteries, for whom all the most able architects worked, of very advanced design for the time.  It is one of the very earliest domestic buildings to have had a piped water supply and flushing drains, fed from springs which continued to supply the house until only about ten years ago.  Nevertheless, it was hardly modern plumbing by today's standards; in Thomas Larke's 1566 survey of the house, all the main bedrooms contain a "little room within" equipped with a "close stool".

Following the Second World War, during which the house was used by the girls of Wanstead School, it soon became apparent that the days of keeping a house of this size fully staffed and utilised were past and so, in the 1950s, the North wing was let to Essex County Council for use by the Record Office.  This arrangement continued until the end of the 1970s and, during this time, many thousands of Essex schoolchildren visited the annual exhibitions that were mounted there.


A word from the owner

My family have lived at Ingatestone since it was built, we hope you enjoy visting our special house.