Overview

Hoveton Hall Gardens is a must visit whatever the season.

Enjoy a visit to the gardens in early spring when the grounds are carpeted with many different varieties of snowdrops and daffodils.

May and June see the azaleas and rhododendrons take centre stage - an amazing collection of colour which has been described as one of the best displays in Norfolk.

July and August see the formal herbaceous and kitchen gardens coming to the fore with the perfectly manicured lawns and over 600 different plant varieties, some of which are rare and unusual.

Our restored 19th-century iron glasshouse is must see for all visitors to the gardens. Throughout the year the gardens host many different events most of which are free to Historic Houses members. We also run a number of guided tours of Hoveton Hall via Invitation to view which are an additional cost.

 


Today
Today’s opening hours

10 April to 30 September: Sundays to Fridays, 10.30am to 5pm

Opening
Opening

2020

10 April to 30 September: Sundays to Fridays, 10.30am to 5pm

 

Find Us
Find us

Just outside the village of Hoveton which is 9 miles north-east of Norwich on the A1151. There are plenty of brown tourist signs nearby to guide you.

The nearest train station is approximately 1.5 miles away in Hoveton.

From Norwich: From the Inner Ring Road A147 at the St Crispins roundabout, take the A1151 Sprowston Road. Stay on the A1151, leaving the city through Sprowston and Rackheath before going through Wroxham. Leave Wroxham on the A1151 heading towards Hoveton. Go straight over the double mini roundabout staying on the A1151, which becomes Stalham Road. After approximately 1 mile, go straight on at the crossroads (St Peters Lane on your left and Long Lane on your right). After around a quarter of a mile take the next left turn (unnamed track next to the gatehouse) and follow the long drive right up to the Hall. 

Postcode covers Hoveton Hall Gardens as well as the Hall. (PLEASE DO NOT FOLLOWS THE SIGNS TO THE GARDENS, THIS IS THE WRONG ENTRANCE). The entrance to the Hall is from the A1151 – situated just outside the village of Hoveton heading towards Stalham.

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free.

Adults: £7.50 
Over 60's: £6.50 
Children over 4: £4 
Family ticket: £20 
Wheelchair users and carers: £6

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Accessible toilets
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
Group Visits
Group Visits

Private group visits to the house and garden are welcome. 

Please contact Rachel Buxton for more information: 

rachel@hovetonhallestate.co.uk

01603 784297

Please check the website for further information, admission times and details for our special events

Visit website

Forthcoming Tours

16 Jul 2020
2PM - 5PM | £17.00

6 Sep 2020
2PM - 5PM | £17.00

14 Oct 2020
2PM - 5PM | £17.00

13 Dec 2020
11AM - 1PM | £20.00

Tour Overview

Tour of main reception rooms with the owner. Visitors are then welcome to spend time in the gardens, where they can see the glasshouse, lake, walled gardens and woods.

Intimate Christmas tour on 13 December includes buffet lunch and mulled wine.

Tour duration

3 hours.

Tour prices

£17.00 per person.

£20.00 per person for lunch tours.

Refreshments

Afternoon tea with home-made cakes and biscuits. Some winter tours include lunch.

Access notes

Two steps to the front door with another step into the house. Main reception rooms have no further steps but there are three steps to access a downstairs loo and the library. The garden is extensive and sloping but areas around house are easily accessible.

Special restrictions

No photography in the house, no dogs, no stilettos.

Weddings

Your wedding day is very special and you'll want your reception to be the perfect occasion. Our secluded gardens at Hoveton Hall are an oasis of colour and calm and will make a wonderful backdrop to your reception.

Of course, when you hold your wedding reception in our gardens yours will be the only one taking place at Hoveton Hall Estate that day. This is our home, and we love to share the secret of its beauty with our visitors, but on your special day it's all yours.

Facilities

  • Suppliers list
  • Overnight guest accommodation
  • Wedding planner
  • Bridal suite
  • Guest parking
  • Accessible parking
  • In-house catering

Accommodation

Hoveton Hall is a much-loved family home but we're also delighted to be able to share it with visitors. Soak up the beauty and atmosphere of this elegant Regency house, whether for an overnight or short-break bed & breakfast stay in the hall or a longer break in our self-contained East Wing holiday cottage. Hoveton Hall Estate is perfectly placed for you to explore this lovely part of Norfolk. 

Our Luxury B&B 

The South West Room
Sleeps two in a kingsize wooden bed (cot available on request)
Large bathroom with huge bath and shower attachment

The Buxton Suite
Sleeps two in the main bedroom in a super king size wooden sleigh bed. The second room can accommodate two children or adults in two full-size single beds. Luxurious large bathroom with bath and separate double shower.

The East Wing
Our self-catering accommodation sleeps six in three bedrooms.
Can be booked online here.


Corporate Hire

Corporate events

The estate offers stunning photo opportunities for product launches and a unique venue for corporate away days and team building, meetings and conferences.

Accommodating up to 25 people in the Hall and up to 500 outside we can help you with travel arrangements, IT requirements, catering and the fun stuff too! 

Facilities

  • Wifi
  • Breakfast
  • Dinner
  • Team building activities
  • Overnight accommodation
  • Lunch
  • Plentiful parking
  • Projector and screen
  • Refreshments

Today
Today’s opening hours

10 April to 30 September: Sundays to Fridays, 10.30am to 5pm

Opening
Opening

2020

10 April to 30 September: Sundays to Fridays, 10.30am to 5pm

 

Find Us
Find us

Just outside the village of Hoveton which is 9 miles north-east of Norwich on the A1151. There are plenty of brown tourist signs nearby to guide you.

The nearest train station is approximately 1.5 miles away in Hoveton.

From Norwich: From the Inner Ring Road A147 at the St Crispins roundabout, take the A1151 Sprowston Road. Stay on the A1151, leaving the city through Sprowston and Rackheath before going through Wroxham. Leave Wroxham on the A1151 heading towards Hoveton. Go straight over the double mini roundabout staying on the A1151, which becomes Stalham Road. After approximately 1 mile, go straight on at the crossroads (St Peters Lane on your left and Long Lane on your right). After around a quarter of a mile take the next left turn (unnamed track next to the gatehouse) and follow the long drive right up to the Hall. 

Postcode covers Hoveton Hall Gardens as well as the Hall. (PLEASE DO NOT FOLLOWS THE SIGNS TO THE GARDENS, THIS IS THE WRONG ENTRANCE). The entrance to the Hall is from the A1151 – situated just outside the village of Hoveton heading towards Stalham.

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free.

Adults: £7.50 
Over 60's: £6.50 
Children over 4: £4 
Family ticket: £20 
Wheelchair users and carers: £6

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Accessible toilets
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
Group Visits
Group Visits

Private group visits to the house and garden are welcome. 

Please contact Rachel Buxton for more information: 

rachel@hovetonhallestate.co.uk

01603 784297

Other opening


Hoveton Hall Gardens's history and features

There was a manor house called Hoveton Hall on the property which was demolished when the new house was built in 1809. The site of this old manor is unclear as no part of the building remains. However Basil Cozens-Hardy analysed the existing maps and data and concluded.

The originator of Hoveton Hall was Christabell Burroughes who commissioned Humphry Repton to construct the mansion in 1809.

Christabell was born in 1764. Her father was Henry Negus (1734-1807) a solicitor who worked in Bungay, Suffolk but who also owned Hoveton Hall. The Negus family had for a long time been wealthy landowners in the Hoveton area.

In 1789 Christabell married James Burkin Burroughes who had inherited Burlingham Hall in Norfolk (now demolished). The couple lived at Burlingham Hall for some time but unfortunately in 1803 at the age of only 43 James died leaving Christabell to care for seven sons and one daughter.

She remained at the Hall for several years. In 1807 her father Henry Negus died and as she was his sole heir she became owner of Hoveton Hall with its existing old manor house. Possibly because her eldest son Henry Negus Burroughes was to turn 21 in 1812 and therefore inherit Burlingham Hall, she decided to build her own house at Hoveton. By 1812 the new house was complete and she moved there with her younger children. She suffered a severe loss three years later when two of her sons James and Edward who had been sent to Cambridge University died there within a week of each other because of an outbreak of an infectious fever.

Christabell was a very good gardener and was mentioned frequently in the gardening magazines of the time. She had the walled garden constructed early as it is shown in the Enclosure Map of 1828. In 1841 James Grigor, a botanist visited Hoveton Hall and gave a very favourable account of the garden.

In 1912 Sir Jacob Preston, the grandson of the first Preston owner, sold the Hall to Reverend John Hare Beevor (1861-1914). After his death two years later in 1914 his wife Susan continued to live at the property but she decided to sell it in 1919.

The new owner was Geoffrey Fowell Buxton (1852-1929) who was a Director of the Barclay Bank. He was also involved in the Volunteer movement and was the second in command of the 1st Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment. In 1903 he was the Mayor of the Norwich Town Council. When he died in 1929 his wife Mary put the property on the market. An advertisement for the sale of the house is shown.

George Cradock bought the house but unfortunately his wife Eunice died in 1934 and he put the property up for sale the following year. Captain Henry Douglas Clark (1889-1952) who was the son of a very prominent shipbuilder purchased the house and made substantial renovations. In 1946 Desmond Buxton bought the Hall and it has remained in the Buxton family since then.


Things to See