Overview

Hartsheath is a Grade II* 18th and 19th-century country house, set in a 19th-century landscape park.

The Drawing Room has trompe l'oeil decoration with pineapple motifs. The house also contains a unique collection of Welsh watercolours and works by the "Jewish Holbein" Isidor Kaufmann, as well as interesting collection of furniture and porcelain.

There is a 6-acre garden for visitors to explore.


Opening
Opening

2020

1 to 3, 8, 23 to 25 May

3, 7, 10 June

29 to 31 August

14 to 16, 23 to 25 September

2pm to 5pm

Find Us
Find us

Hartsheath is situated on the A541 between Wrexham and Mold.

Admission
Admission

Historic House members visit for free. 

Normal price: £6.00

Forthcoming Tours

6 May 2020
2PM - 4PM | £15.00

26 May 2020
2PM - 4PM | £15.00

9 Jun 2020
2PM - 4PM | £15.00

28 Aug 2020
2PM - 4PM | £15.00

1 Sep 2020
2PM - 4PM | £15.00

17 Sep 2020
2PM - 4PM | £15.00

Tour Overview

Go on a tour of the ground floor of the house, including a unique collection of “Welsh” 18th and 19th Cent watercolours and works by, the “Jewish Holbein”, Isidor Kaufmann as well as interesting collections of furniture and porcelain. There is a six acre garden also for visitors to explore.

Tour duration

2 hours.

Tour prices

£15.00 per person.

Refreshments

Tea, coffee, sandwiches and cakes.

Access notes

Limited and no disabled lavatory. Most of ground floor is accessible.

Special restrictions

No animals.

Weddings


Opening
Opening

2020

1 to 3, 8, 23 to 25 May

3, 7, 10 June

29 to 31 August

14 to 16, 23 to 25 September

2pm to 5pm

Find Us
Find us

Hartsheath is situated on the A541 between Wrexham and Mold.

Admission
Admission

Historic House members visit for free. 

Normal price: £6.00

Other opening


Hartsheath's history and features

The Hartsheath estate was owned by the Lloyd family in the early 18th century, and it was probably the Lloyds who were responsible for the first-known house on the site, probably built in 1702. The house was remodelled in the late 18th century, before the estate was purchased by Colonel Wardell.

The house appears to have fallen into ruin quite quickly, and by 1819 was in poor condition. That's when the Welsh Iron and Coal Mining Company stepped in. The Company called upon a little-known architect named Charles Mathews to design a residence for the company's director, incorporating parts of the earlier building. Mathews had worked with John Nash in London, and was a student of AW Pugin. Despite his famous teachers, Hartsheath is his only known work. The style of the new building seems to have been based on the Shire Hall in Chester.

The Welsh Iron and Coal Mining Company spent 5000 pounds on the new house, but it was money ill spent, for it drained the company coffers, and the firm was forced to close. The new house was then purchased by the Jones family. The only other time it appears on the pages of history is during WWII, when it was requisitioned by the military and used as a base for cartographers working on plans for the D-Day landings.

The house stands 2 storeys high, with a main wing of 5 bays, integrating classical motifs like a Doric porch. The interior features an entrance hall with a black marble fireplace Regency oak details, and early 19th century doors. The drawing room has trompe l'oiel painting decoration with pineapple motifs. The service areas, adapted from the earliest house here, include a servants' hall, butler's pantry, and Victorian kitchens. Under the main house block are vaulted cellars.


A word from the owner

When taking over Hartsheath the opportunity to improve on my mother-in-laws efforts was irresistible!