Please note: This house does not offer free entry to Historic House members.
For alternative options please see other opening options.

Other opening

Overview

Harlington is a medium-sized, village centre manor house, with 14th-century hall house origins.

There are 16th, 19th and 20th-century additions including an Elizabethan Great Chamber, fine 17th-century panelled Great and Little Parlours and a panelled state bedroom in which Charles II is reputed to have slept. There is also an interesting extension dating to 1937 by Sir Albert Richardson PRA.

The house was used for the interrogation (by Sir Francis Wingate, the then owner) and brief imprisonment of John Bunyan in 1660.

It houses an interesting collection of art, antiques and ephemera, including works by Landseer, Peter de Wint, James Northcote RA, John Afflick, Emma Vidal and Wolf von Lenkiewicz.

 


Opening
Opening

Open by Private Tours and prior appointments only.

Find Us
Find us

On Westoning Road, in the centre of the village of Harlington, 1 mile from J12 of the M1. The house is 300 yards from Harlington Mainline station, 45 minutes from St Pancras International. Intermittent buses to Milton Keynes

  • Offers bike storage
Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Taxi

Britannia Cabs 01525 600600

Admission
Admission

£7.50 for house tour
£12.50 for house tour plus tea and cake

Advance notice required except on notice days.

Group Visits
Group Visits

Please contact in order to book a group visit.

Please check the website for further information, admission times and details for our special events

Visit website

Forthcoming Tours

3 Sep 2020
2PM - 5PM | £16.50

11 Dec 2020
1PM - 5PM | £16.50

Tour Overview

Go on a guided tour and explore the entire property, including the gardens, but not the attic if there are large numbers (over 15).

Tour duration

2.5 hours

Tour prices

£15.00 per person.

Refreshments

Tea and cakes.

Access notes

5 steps in garden. Steps into ground floor and steps in various rooms on ground floor. If there is assistance, ground floor should be possible, though would involve viewing certain rooms from outside if wheelchair manipulation is to be minimised.

Special restrictions

No photography in the house.

Invitation to Stay

All rooms have free toiletries, a Nespresso coffee machine and a kettle. Rooms have access to mini fridges with fresh milk.

The King's Room is a 17th century time capsule. It has a dramatic crimson damask state bed, 17th and 18th century antiques, and the hugest bath imaginable! The Tabor Room has an Anglo-Indian 1850's state bed and ensuite bathroom with spa bath, whilst the Garden Room ( 2/3 of a Tudor great chamber) has spectacular ceiling heights, a Regency four poster and a private bathroom. The Wainscot Room is themed and cosy. It is fully panelled, partially with 16th century panelling.

You are welcome to make use of one of the reception rooms to read and relax.

We like to think that we are top hosts. We really enjoy running a B and B – and we like to think that shows. We have won numerous awards, so perhaps others agree! We have been voted in the top three bed and breakfasts in the UK by the London Times. The Independent newspaper placed us in the top 10 British Bed and Breakfasts, whilst Sawdays have placed us as their number one historical properties.

The house is brilliantly located for journeys to London, Oxbridge and Luton.

 

Weddings


Accommodation

Four bedrooms, three of which are ensuite, with spectacular period interiors. Breakfast is taken at a long table in Great Parlour, complete with 1815 Flight Barr porcelain. Coffee machines can be found in each room. Harlington Manor was voted one of the top three B&Bs in the UK by The Times. 


Corporate Hire

Corporate events

Come to Harlington Manor and receive use of the Great and Little Parlours, in conjunction with the B&B facilities, as conference and breakaway facilities.

Facilities

  • Wifi
  • Lunch
  • Overnight accommodation
  • Refreshments
  • Dinner
  • Breakfast

Opening
Opening

Open by Private Tours and prior appointments only.

Find Us
Find us

On Westoning Road, in the centre of the village of Harlington, 1 mile from J12 of the M1. The house is 300 yards from Harlington Mainline station, 45 minutes from St Pancras International. Intermittent buses to Milton Keynes

  • Offers bike storage
Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Taxi

Britannia Cabs 01525 600600

Admission
Admission

£7.50 for house tour
£12.50 for house tour plus tea and cake

Advance notice required except on notice days.

Group Visits
Group Visits

Please contact in order to book a group visit.

Other opening


Harlington Manor's history and features

English Heritage, in their listing notice, ascribe Harlington Manor to the 16th century, though it is highly likely, having regard to architectural, documentary and locational information, that the house dates, in fact, to the late 14th century and possibly even to an exact date-1396. The proto feminist, lady of letters and Wingate relation, Anna Letitia Barbauld, claimed, in her memoirs, published posthumously, that her uncle remembered a nameplate bearing that date. The ground floor plan follows, as to the earliest part of the house, classic hall house configuration, whilst flat laid joists in the little parlour, evidence of a screens passage , proximity to the church and the layout of individual rooms all strongly suggest a medieval construction date.

The house was initially owned by the Burwell Family (who eventually emigrated, in the 17th century, to Virginia), from around 1400, but it passed, through intermarriage, to the Wingate family in the early 17th Century. It was, the listing notice claims, actually owned by Edmund Wingate, mathematician and tutor to Queen Henrietta Maria.

Famously, John Bunyan, the English divine, was interrogated by Sir Francis Wingate and briefly imprisoned in the house, in November 1660. Bunyan was sent to Bedford gaol where, over the next 12 years, he wrote The Pilgrim's Progress. It is thought that Harlington Manor is the only building, still standing, at which Bunyan is known to have stayed.

Charles II is said to have stayed briefly at the house in the late 17th century, possibly to thank Sir Francis Wingate for his help in dealing with the potential sedition of John Bunyan, or, perhaps more probably, to attend the wedding of Sir Francis, to the daughter of the Earl of Anglesey. Certainly, Sir Francis was knighted around the time of the marriage-marriage into the aristocracy being a common reason for elevation into the aristocracy.