Please note: This house does not offer free entry to Historic House members.
For alternative options please see other opening options.

Other opening

Overview

An avenue of double oaks leads to a mellow Tudor building with fine detailing, surrounded by a large, fish-filled moat with two outer moats. The site dates from the Anglo-Saxon period.

The house has recently undergone an award-winning restoration. The adjoining barn, also 16th century and earlier, is one of the longest in the country, part of which is thought to have been an early court hall. Fine garden setting. 

The garden with courtyard following 16th century footings, formal pool garden and knot garden, has all recently been designed by Xa Tollemache.


Opening
Opening

Open by Private Tour only.

Minimum number of visitors 15, maximum 40.

Find Us
Find us

Crows Hall is situated approximately a mile east of the village of Debenham. From the A14, turn onto the A140 heading north towards Diss/Norwich. When approaching Earl Stonham (there is a speed camera and the limit is 30 mph), turn right onto the A1120 signposted Debenham, Pettaugh and Stonham Aspal Barns. Continue on this road until you reach Pettaugh, then turn left signposted Debenham. When approaching Debenham you will reach a T-junction. Turn left onto the B1077 heading into the village. After 100 yards, turn right, crossing the small river. The road bends to the right (Thorpe Lane). Two roads join on this bend (Kenton Road being the left). Continue straight up the unmarked road* between the two houses. This single track road leads to Crows Hall.

From Framlingham and east Suffolk, take A1120 through Earl Soham, continue west along straight road until just before road starts to bend, turn right at small cross roads to Debenham (the left turn is to Crettingham). This is Thorpe Lane. Continue until point where the road bends left just before the village and there are two right hand turns off it. The left of these right hand turns is Kenton Road, but take the right unmarked road*. *For the safety and privacy of your tour, Crow’s Hall will not be signed. Tel: 07860 921031 if lost.

Admission
Admission

All 2019 tours are £18.00 per person, with a discount for Historic Houses members.

Forthcoming Tours

7 Apr 2020
2PM - 5PM | £18.00

14 May 2020
2PM - 5PM | £18.00

9 Jun 2020
2PM - 5PM | £18.00

15 Sep 2020
2PM - 5PM | £18.00

Tour Overview

The tour begins with the exterior of house and barns, internal of part of the 16th century barn, more detail of the house exterior and gardens before group splitting into two groups for a tour of the house and tea.

Tour duration

2.5 to 3 hours

Tour prices

£18.00

Refreshments

Tea, coffee, biscuits and cakes.

Access notes

Barn, garden and ground floor of house.

Restrictions

No photography in house.

 


Opening
Opening

Open by Private Tour only.

Minimum number of visitors 15, maximum 40.

Find Us
Find us

Crows Hall is situated approximately a mile east of the village of Debenham. From the A14, turn onto the A140 heading north towards Diss/Norwich. When approaching Earl Stonham (there is a speed camera and the limit is 30 mph), turn right onto the A1120 signposted Debenham, Pettaugh and Stonham Aspal Barns. Continue on this road until you reach Pettaugh, then turn left signposted Debenham. When approaching Debenham you will reach a T-junction. Turn left onto the B1077 heading into the village. After 100 yards, turn right, crossing the small river. The road bends to the right (Thorpe Lane). Two roads join on this bend (Kenton Road being the left). Continue straight up the unmarked road* between the two houses. This single track road leads to Crows Hall.

From Framlingham and east Suffolk, take A1120 through Earl Soham, continue west along straight road until just before road starts to bend, turn right at small cross roads to Debenham (the left turn is to Crettingham). This is Thorpe Lane. Continue until point where the road bends left just before the village and there are two right hand turns off it. The left of these right hand turns is Kenton Road, but take the right unmarked road*. *For the safety and privacy of your tour, Crow’s Hall will not be signed. Tel: 07860 921031 if lost.

Admission
Admission

All 2019 tours are £18.00 per person, with a discount for Historic Houses members.

Other opening


Crow's Hall's history and features

Most of the 16th century and earlier parts of the manor house were demolished by about 1700. This included the Great Hall range to the east and the service wing to the south. This left the north reception wing which was built around 1560 and the gatehouse to the west still standing, interlinked by a screen.

By about 1700, a narrow single-story range filled the space between the gatehouse and the west gable of the north wing. At the same time a small service wing was added to the north side, re-using roof timbers apparently from the demolished Great Hall. There is also an extension within the courtyard built soon after 1900. The north wing contains an upper dining chamber (since divided into bedrooms) with panelling of c.1560, and more of it has been moved round within the building. The dining chamber was approached by what may be the earliest example of a balustraded box staircase in England.

The Manorial history at Crow’s Hall dates back to 1086 and the site could have been occupied from earliest times.  It’s name however, would seem to derive from the occupation of John Crow in the late 13th Century.  The name John Crow appears in the Hundred Rolls 191, 1274/5.  It has been suggested that they were a Yarmouth family who made their money in shipping.  It was bought by Jenk in Framlingham in 1397 and passed by decent until the late 17th Century.

In 2005, Crow’s Hall was purchased by the current owner who has recently undertaken an extensive repair schedule on the house, prepared and managed by Nicholas Jacob Architects and executed by R & J Hogg, including re-roofing and the removal of some late 20th century additions.  These works have received awards for Craftsmanship by the Suffolk Association of Architects.

The owner has also landscaped the inner moat, the design of which has been influenced by traditional gardens and includes a kitchen, formal garden with dipping pool, and a courtyard following early foundations of the former Hall and South wing.