Please note: This house does not offer free entry to Historic House members.
For alternative options please see other opening options.

Other opening

Overview

Courteenhall House, built in 1792, is a stunning example of classic Georgian architecture, built by Samuel Saxon.

The grounds were designed by Humphrey Repton and the arboretum is internationally recognised for its collection of rare and beautiful trees and shrubs.

Courteenhall House was commissioned by Sir William Wake (10th baronet), and retains almost all of its original features. It remains the home of the Wake family to this day and is a treasure trove of family and national history. The house is very rarely opened to the public. The grounds were designed by the legendary Humphrey Repton and can be viewed in detail. The arboretum, planted by Sir Hereward Wake (14th baronet), is visited by the International Dendrology Society and the Royal Forestry Society, amongst others, for its stunning and rare specimens.


Opening
Opening

Open by Private Tour only.

Find Us
Find us

From the M1 junction 15, exit the roundabout onto the A508. Ignore road signs to Courteenhall and after passing a right turn signposted “Blisworth”, look for a War Memorial situated opposite a black metal gate with a Lodge House and post box. This is the main entrance to Courteenhall Estate. Pull up close to the gate and it will open automatically. Once inside, follow signs to the Hall.

Forthcoming Tours

Sorry, there are no upcoming tours at the moment. Please check back soon.

Tour Overview

Visit Courteenhall by group booking only. To enquire about group bookings please fill out your details on the form on the page here.

Visitors can view the main rooms of the house as well as the main staircase spectacular first floor corridor with its roof lanterns. The grounds, including the arboretum, and the kitchen garden can be toured, guided by the Head Gardener. Guests are welcome to picnic in grounds.

Tour duration

2.5 hours.

Tour prices

£18.00 per person.

Refreshments

Tea and biscuits.

Access notes

Access to the ground floor of the house only, but this is the vast majority of the toured house area. The grounds have gravel and grass.

Restrictions

Photography in the house is restricted.


Opening
Opening

Open by Private Tour only.

Find Us
Find us

From the M1 junction 15, exit the roundabout onto the A508. Ignore road signs to Courteenhall and after passing a right turn signposted “Blisworth”, look for a War Memorial situated opposite a black metal gate with a Lodge House and post box. This is the main entrance to Courteenhall Estate. Pull up close to the gate and it will open automatically. Once inside, follow signs to the Hall.

Other opening


Courteenhall's history and features

The Wake family have been in South Northamptonshire since the thirteenth century, and at Courteenhall since 1672. Four generations of the family live and work on the Estate now.

Courteenhall is a vibrant business and a way of life for those who live there and is mentioned in the Domesday book. The Estate came into the family originally through an uncle who died without children. It has been farmed since records began.

Over the last few generations the Estate has gradually built up its farming business to farm progressively, efficiently and environmentally both for itself and on a contractual basis for other local farmers.

The original manor house was built in 1572 but was pulled down and replaced with the current Hall in 1792 by Sir William Wake, the tenth baronet. The Hall is a beautiful Georgian house which has changed little in appearance, retaining almost all of its original features. It is home to the Wake family but doubles up as an exclusive venue for hosting a variety of events as well as filming and photoshoots.

As well as the Hall, there are a large number of characterful period buildings around the Estate, many of which are available as residential properties to rent.

There was little woodland on the Estate until the thirteenth and fourteenth baronets began planting trees. Courteenhall is now blessed with some lovely woods and its internationally reputed arboretum.