Overview

Cornwall House is the last remaining privately occupied house in main shopping steeet of Monmouth.

It is a town house, dating back to at least the 17th-century. The red brick garden façade is in the Queen Anne style, dating from 1752 when the house belonged to Henry de Bergh, the Duke of Beaufort’s agent.

The street façade was remodelled in the Georgian style (date unknown). Many original features remain, including a fine staircase. The house still has the original walled kitchen garden.


Opening
Opening

2020

9 - 13 April

8 - 10, 23 - 25 May

8 - 9, 29 - 31 August

Plus Fridays in July and August

Open between 2pm and 5pm

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///ships.trucked.manlyWhat does this mean?

Located half way down the main shopping street in Monmouth.

The house is set back behind brown railings. Please come to centre door.

The nearest train stations are Hereford, Newport, Abergavenny and Chepstow. There are scheduled bus services from all four (direct from train station in Hereford) to Monmouth bus station which is 2 minute walk from Cornwall House. There is also a direct bus service from Ross-on-Wye. Bus timetables can be found here.

 

Parking

There are several paying car parks near Cornwall House. Limited free on street parking in Monnow Street. No parking is available on-site for visitors.

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free.

Non-members: £5

Concessions: £2

Forthcoming Tours

20 May 2020
1PM - 3PM | £22.00

24 Jul 2020
10AM - 12PM | £10.50

Tour Overview

Go on a guided tour of the reception rooms and garden and discover the stories and history of Cornwall House with the house owner.

Tour duration

2 hours.

Tour prices

£10.50 per person including tea, coffee and biscuits.

£22.00 per person including two-course lunch.

Refreshments

Coffee and biscuits with morning tours, 2 course lunch with wine and coffee with afternoon tours.

Access notes

No wheelchair access. There are 6 steps to both street and garden facade.

Special restrictions

No dogs permitted.


Opening
Opening

2020

9 - 13 April

8 - 10, 23 - 25 May

8 - 9, 29 - 31 August

Plus Fridays in July and August

Open between 2pm and 5pm

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///ships.trucked.manlyWhat does this mean?

Located half way down the main shopping street in Monmouth.

The house is set back behind brown railings. Please come to centre door.

The nearest train stations are Hereford, Newport, Abergavenny and Chepstow. There are scheduled bus services from all four (direct from train station in Hereford) to Monmouth bus station which is 2 minute walk from Cornwall House. There is also a direct bus service from Ross-on-Wye. Bus timetables can be found here.

 

Parking

There are several paying car parks near Cornwall House. Limited free on street parking in Monnow Street. No parking is available on-site for visitors.

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free.

Non-members: £5

Concessions: £2

Other opening


Walks

Walk around the original walled garden and beautiful grounds. 



Cornwall House's history and features

The house was constructed in several stages, and occupies the sites of at least three burgages. In 1678 it was known as the Great House and was owned by George Milborne, brother of the recusant George Milborne of Wonastow; in 1699 it was owned by Thomas Brewer, blacksmith. The Duke of Beaufort's agent, Henry Burgh, acquired it and was responsible for building the Queen Anne style frontage facing the fields at Chippenham – at the rear of the building as it now appears.

What is now the rear of the building has a whitewashed stone dressing that covers the main red brick construction. It has two-plus-three-plus-two bays, with the central three under a pediment enclosing Diocletian windows and with a rusticated surround. There is a simple but elegant early nineteenth century staircase, and an Adamesque chimney piece with nicely carved timber. A plaque on the outside gives the date of that part of the building as 1752. The secluded walled garden, which the rear of the current building now overlooks, originally contained a grandstand from which the Duke and his friends could watch horse racing on Chippenham fields.

The building now faces Monnow Street. The façade that looks onto the street is Georgian and shows two floors and an attic, with the building being set behind a railed forecourt. The new frontage was added in 1770, and (slightly later) a porch, fanlights and side doors were added in the late 18th century. The house now has five bays, under a cornice and pedimented porch on slender Doric columns.

At some point in the 19th century the house was split into two parts, and the spaces between the house and the neighbouring buildings was filled by two single storey extensions. The one on the left provides access to number 56, which is now the office of the Monmouthshire Beacon newspaper, while the one on the right provides a kitchen to number 58. The street entrance to number 58 retains an elegant lampholder over the gate in the ironwork front fence.

Inside the building, the original staircases are still extant, and there is "an Adamesque chimneypiece of timber carved with exquisite delicacy".


A word from the owner

Cornwall House is a great example of how town houses changed and developed during Monmouth’s period of economic prosperity in the 18th and 19-century. We hope you enjoy your visit.