Overview

One of the most interesting Tudor manor houses in Devon. Built in 1550, Cadhay retains the hall of an earlier house.

An Elizabethan Long Gallery was added to form a unique courtyard with statues of Tudor sovereigns on each side described by Sir Simon Jenkins as 'one of the treasures of Devon'.

By the 18th-century the house was in a poor state of repair and the new owner restored the house in the Georgian style. He panelled a number of the rooms, installed sash windows and inserted a ceiling in the Great Hall under the magnificent timbered roof.By 1911 the house was again in poor condition and it was heavily restored with a lot of the Tudor hearths being uncovered. Recently it has been refurbished to restore it to its previous splendour.

Cadhay is open for guided tours on Fridays, May to September.


Opening
Opening

2020

1 May - 25 September: Fridays; guided tours only, 2pm to 5pm (last tour 4pm).

Also 23 - 25 May and 30 & 31 August.

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///tone.overdrive.wing. What does this mean?

1 mile north west of Ottery St Mary. From the west take the A30 and exit at Pattesons cross and follow signs for Fairmile and Cadhay. From the east exit the A30 at Iron Bridge, the first exit after Honiton, and follow signs as above.

Take a train to Honiton (5 miles) or Feniton (2miles) and arrange a taxi to Cadhay.

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Taxi

Horseshoes 01404 850800

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free. 

House and gardens: £8

Garden only: £4

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Wheelchair ramps/routes
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
  • Accessible toilets
Group Visits
Group Visits

Groups are welcome to visit Cadhay.

Please check the website for further information, admission times and details for our special events

Visit website

Invitation to Stay

Cadhay is a truly magical place to stay for a remarkable and unique self-catering holiday for groups of family and friends. Though the Tudor manor exudes the history and grandeur of centuries past it is far from a museum. Cadhay has been beautifully restored and offers modern comforts. It is a place where you can live comfortably and confidently in the rural Devon countryside, the past all around you, yet still very much in touch with the modern world of today.

Cadhay Manor House


The Manor House dates back to the 16th Century and its history and appeal are clear to see. In recent years Cadhay has been transformed into a house used for weddings, family gatherings and for groups wanting a large house to stay in together.

There are a total of 12 bedrooms throughout the house which will comfortably sleep 22, if you need more beds we have a further three holiday cottages which sleep an additional 14 people. This makes us ideal for large groups wanting luxurious accommodation in the heart of East Devon.

Cadhay Manor House

Weddings

A stay at Cadhay allows you exclusive and private use of the House and its magnificent gardens allowing you to create a wedding that is unique to you. It is a bit like being married from your own house, albeit a Tudor Manor.

 

Facilities

  • Suppliers list
  • Bridal suite
  • Overnight guest accommodation
  • Guest parking
  • Wedding planner
  • Accessible parking

It is hard to put into words how much we enjoyed spending our wedding weekend at Cadhay with all our friends and family. The setting was perfect, better than we ever imagined. We have some fantastic photographs and will be back to celebrate anniversaries to come

Bride and Groom


Accommodation

Cadhay is a truly magical place to stay for a remarkable and unique self-catering holiday for groups of family or friends.

Though the Tudor manor exudes the history and grandeur of centuries past, it is far from a museum. Cadhay has been beautifully restored and offers modern comforts so that you can live comfortably in the Devon countryside with the past all around you.

Cadhay is available for you and your friends to stay for a week throughout the year, although outside the main holiday season you can stay for just a weekend.

Accommodation in the house

The house has 13 bedrooms and you can choose whether to stay in a traditional four poster or a more contemporary version crafted by Cadhay's furniture maker owner. Alternatively you can sleep under the eaves in the cosy attic rooms.

Central heating has been installed throughout and additionally there are woodburning stoves for extra comfort. The kitchen with aga and electric oven is very well equipped and you can dine under the watchful eye of the family portrait of Sir Isaac Newton in the magnificent dining room. There are three main reception rooms for you to use one of which has a Steinway piano.

Accommodation in cottages

The Coach house which sleeps 6 is light and very spacious with exposed beams upstairs and excellent antiques and paintings, bright rugs and quality curtains. The Stables also sleeps 6 and is very similar but slightly smaller than the Coach house. It overlooks the main house and looks out onto the walled garden which is used for allotments.

The Cider Press is a single storey cottage with double or twin bedroom and panoramic views to Cadhay and beyond.


Opening
Opening

2020

1 May - 25 September: Fridays; guided tours only, 2pm to 5pm (last tour 4pm).

Also 23 - 25 May and 30 & 31 August.

Find Us
Find us

The main visitor entrance is at ///tone.overdrive.wing. What does this mean?

1 mile north west of Ottery St Mary. From the west take the A30 and exit at Pattesons cross and follow signs for Fairmile and Cadhay. From the east exit the A30 at Iron Bridge, the first exit after Honiton, and follow signs as above.

Take a train to Honiton (5 miles) or Feniton (2miles) and arrange a taxi to Cadhay.

Parking

Car park on site

  • Free

Taxi

Horseshoes 01404 850800

Admission
Admission

Historic Houses members visit for free. 

House and gardens: £8

Garden only: £4

Accessibility
Accessibility
  • Wheelchair ramps/routes
  • Guide dogs welcome
  • Accessible parking
  • Accessible toilets
Group Visits
Group Visits

Groups are welcome to visit Cadhay.

Other opening


Cadhay's history and features

Cadhay was built by John Haydon in 1550 on the site of an earlier house. His nephew Robert built the Long Gallery, a feature of late 16th century housebuilding, closing in the south side of the house to form a courtyard that became known as the Court of the Sovereigns because of the four statues of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth that stand over the doors.

Robert was married to Joan, the daughter of Sir Amias Poulett, Privy Councillor, former ambassador to France and Keeper of Mary Queen of Scots during her imprisonment.Her cousin, William Paulet, was also on the Privy Council for all for Tudor monarchs which might explain why the courtyard is adorned with statues of each of them.

By 1737 the house was in a poor state of repair and the new owner, Peere Williams, restored the house in the style of that period. He plastered up most of the Tudor hearths and panelled a number of the rooms. He inserted a lower ceiling in the Great Hall under the magnificent timbered roof to form the current dining room and upstairs Roof Chamber.

Being a large house, there were times in the 18th and 19th centuries when Cadhay was divided into two. It again fell into a bad state of repair.

Read more about Cadhay's history here


Things to See